Remnant snow just west of Mt Gingera

Wednesday 14 June: Mt Gingera from Corin Dam. This walk didn’t go ahead last week because of the weather but we’ll try again this week. The walk is 20 km and involves a total climb of 1,200 m, with a steep 500-m altitude gain in the first 2 km. From Corin Dam head up Stockyard Spur and on to Pryors Hut. From here we go off-track and climb steeply to the northern summit of Mt Gingera, then follow the ACT/NSW border (more or less) through open woodland south along the summit ridge of Mt Gingera to the main summit. From the summit we’ll take the footpad to Mt Franklin Road and follow it back to Pryors Hut, then return to Corin Dam via our outward route. Leader: Philip G. Cars: 90 km, $10. Meeting: Kambah Village Shops for ***8 am*** departure. Map: Corin Dam. Weather: Forecast for Mt Ginini at this stage is mostly sunny, light winds, -2 to 7.

Further Information

My last trip here 5 Nov 16.

Summary

Distance: 20.0km | Climb: 1160m | Time: 8.55am – 3.50pm (6hrs 55mins), including 50 mins of breaks | Grading: L/E-M; H(13)

Photographs

Photographs are available, where you can start a large sized slideshow. Camera back from Canon hospital and performing as it should.

Waypoint and Track Files

Download the .gpx file. (Right click, Save Link As…, Save – if you want to use it.)
To use in Google Earth, do File, Open… and select Gps or All files as the File Type.

Track Notes

I have a little bit of bush car mechanical trouble. Thanks to the generosity of the leader, I was picked up outside my old folks home and driven in reliable comfort to Corin Dam. Foggy in Canberra, but a beautiful sunny day at the bottom of the Brindabella Range.

There is no warmup for this walk – the steep climb begins immediately. Once in the lee of the flank of the hill, the breeze dropped and layers were soon stripped off. There was not much talking as we puffed up to the helipad, making the 2.3km in just under 1 hour.

A brief regroup, then the next leg to the lookout area. A quick peek from the NW slab, then morning tea on the east side of the track, at the Graeme Barrow named ‘Stockyard Spur Grandstand’. We lamented his recent death.

The brumby yard remains are hardly visible as the track passes them. On to the intersection with the Mt Franklin Road and so along to Pryors Hut. Seems to be a bit of clearing on both the north side of the hut and the SW side where the new toilet is going in.

We walked on past the Scotts Pine arboretum (The pines below the hut were planted in the 1950s by members of the Snowy Mountains Authority Landscape Section. They are Scotts Pine (Pinus silvestris). – according to signage in the hut). Stopped at border marker Q57 and told its story.

Another 200 vertical metre puff up to SH1847 on the NW end of the Gingera ridge. Visited S57 and R57.

A delightful stroll along the ridge, walking through tiny remnant patched of snow. Great views to the SW over Tantangara Dam to the distant Mt Jagungal and the snowy Main Range. Itching to get down to Brumbys Flats, but no time.

We swarmed over the real Mt Gingera (originally Mt Mouat) and kind party members searched for Harry’s “1” Gaspipe driven into cleft of Boulder”. No joy. On to the sick-looking guyed pole area for the great views and lunch.

We returned via the Mt Gingera footpad, then Mt Franklin Rd to Pryors Hut and so back down to the cars.

Why a photo of the steps at the start of the track up to the helipad? I was at the opening of the track and it was explained that the risers/treads of the steps represent the climbs and (short) flats of the track that climbs to the crest of Stockyard Spur.

Great bunch of people and the usual no-fuss leadership from Philip (who continues his effortless walking style). I’m getting old and slow 🙁 .

Track Maps

Track overview

Track 1

Track 2

Party

14 walkers.

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... bushwalking in the ACT and nearby NSW. I began my love affair with the ACT bush in 2004 after completing the Canberra Bushwalking Club's annual Navigation Refresher. Seven sessions of navigation and bushcraft shared by living legends had me hooked. It's grown from a passion to an obsession. With other responsibilities it's hard to get away overnight, so I usually only day walk. I like gadgets and technobabble. Information on this blog is shared in the hope that it might encourage others to get out and breathe a bit of fresh air.