Sydney’s Bush Club and CBC party at Hospital Creek Hut

Tuesday 29 August: Boboyan Trig from Hospital Creek Hut – M/R. Walk from the Yankee Hat car park to Hospital Creek Hut. Join 10 walkers from the Sydney Bush Club and walk east up through granite tors to Boboyan Trig. Huge views from the slabs NW of the top, down through the geological fault line. Return SW from the top through the ‘Snoopy Dog’ rock formation just south of the hut. Around 15km (6km from Hospital Creek Hut) and 330m climb. Map: Yaouk. Leader: John Evans 0417 436 877 john@johnevans.id.au . Transport: ∼$15 per person.

Further Information

Morrie D contacted me via this blog a few months ago, saying he was bringing a Sydney Bush Club party down to camp at Hospital Creek Hut. I offered a little day trip that might interest them on the Tuesday.

Last time I did something similar was 16 Jun 09.

Summary

From Yankee Hat car park: Distance: 15.5km | Climb: 615m | Time: 8.00am – 3.05pm (7hrs 5mins), including 1 hr 20 mins of breaks | Grading: L/R; M(11)

From Hospital Creek Hut: Distance: 7.0km | Climb: 490m | Time: 9.10am – 2.15pm (5hrs 5mins), including 1 hr of breaks | Grading: M/R; M(9)

Photographs

Photographs are available, where you can start a large sized slideshow.

Waypoint and Track Files

Download the .gpx file. (Right click, Save Link As…, Save – if you want to use it.)
To use in Google Earth, do File, Open… and select Gps or All files as the File Type.

Track Notes

We CBC walkers met at Lanyon Marketplace, opposite my old folks home, at 7.15am. An experienced front seat passenger kanga spotter got us safely to the Yankee Hat car park, where we quickly shook out and were walking at 8.00am. So a 40km, 45min drive.

A glorious blue-sky late winter day. We had a quick look at the high hills in the centre of Namadgi National Park, dusted in snow – Mts Namadgi, Burbidge and Kelly.

The ladies showed us their heels as we walked the 4.2km in 50mins to Hospital Creek Hut. I’d said to Morrie that we’d be there by 9.30 or 10am, so arriving at 8.50am we were chronically early (as I always am). But we were warmly welcomed and, after introductions and being told that it was -6ºC on the thermometer early in the morning), we set out on our little day walk after 20mins.

A successful negotiation of Hospital Creek a little downstream from the wet area in front of the hut (we’d broken the ice in the creek as we drove across the ford coming in to Yankee Hat car park) and we headed a little south of east, with much conversation.

I must say, these folk are not only lovely people, but greatly experienced world, Australian, Sydney area and even local walkers. Such a depth of experience, even with knowledge of our Canberra region. I was a little in awe of them. As the day progressed, many stories of shared friends, including Rowan P and Karen C.

Still, up the front, I could pretend that I knew what I was doing and knew where we were going. In actuality, it was on a wing and a prayer and the ‘drunkard’s walk’ technique to find the best going route. Sidling to the east, we struck a creek line with some nice granite blocks. We handrailed the creek for a bit, then crossed to its true let side and climbed a bit till morning tea.

A bit south of east after our break, climbing towards the saddle between Hospital Hill and Mt Boboyan (the similarly named feature some distance to the SSW is Boboyan Hill). A couple of patches of scrubby wattles, but generally relatively easy walking. Struck some nice granite slabs just after morning tea which provided grand views back to the west.

Trended south near the saddle (cut the corner) and enjoyed open woodland walking, then a final little climb, to take us to Boboyan trig. A photo op.

With track markers and a track beckoning, we turned back and NW, following the well defined footpad down to the viewing slabs. Snow in the steps area going down. We all enjoyed the signage and views to the ‘wild heart of Namadgi’ as we munched. Inordinately long breaks for visitors 😆 .

Back to the trig and a few tens of metres along the Yerrabi Walking Track, we went bush again. A bit of a loop to the SW then NW saw us on the true left of a drainage line. A more open (and pleasant because we were going down) descent to a great granite feature overlooking Hospital Creek Hut. A good mate of mine and I, on our first visit, thought the boulder formation looked like Charles Schultz’s Snoopy, so we named it that.

Today, approaching from the easy SE side, I’d forgotten how to get to the top. We circled around clockwise and scrambled up a sharp passage, then reached the top. Lovely views down to the hut and tents. Much yelling to gain attention from the two Bush Club members who elected to stay in camp. Only on descending from the top boulder did Pete (who I’ve only recently met but appreciate to be a very, very experienced walker) point out to me that we were very near our (easy) approach point. So a very elegant and easy descent from the feature!

Another easy crossing of a Hospital Creek feeder and we were soon back at the hut.

A cuppa was kindly offered, but as two CBC members had evening ‘Navigation Refresher’ course commitments, we said our good-byes and headed back to the car (the ladies again well ahead).

I do hope our new friends from the Bush Club enjoyed the day (and their trip to Hospital Creek Hut). I did. And thank you to CBC walkers.

Track Maps

Track overview

Track 1

Track 2

Profile

Google Earth snip

Party

11 walkers – 7 from the Sydney Bush Club – Ron B, Kaye B, Graham C, Morrie D, Barbara M, Lynne O, Gay S; 4 from CBC – Meredith H, Pete H, Ming L, me.

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... bushwalking in the ACT and nearby NSW. I began my love affair with the ACT bush in 2004 after completing the Canberra Bushwalking Club's annual Navigation Refresher. Seven sessions of navigation and bushcraft shared by living legends had me hooked. It's grown from a passion to an obsession. With other responsibilities it's hard to get away overnight, so I usually only day walk. I like gadgets and technobabble. Information on this blog is shared in the hope that it might encourage others to get out and breathe a bit of fresh air.