Cliffs in southern Morton National Park

Coolumburra Cliffs # 4 M/R,ptX. A circuit to continue my exploration of the cliffs of this area, with their dramatic cliff-base scenery and cliff-top views. From Bulee Gap on the Nerriga-Nowra road, we head north across Willies Creek to Pagoda Pass, and further north on the tops till we find a route down. Then north east along a cliff base, doubling back along the wide rock balcony on the cliff top.  In the afternoon, we will head back to the cars by going where the scenery beckons, a little east of our morning route. There will be some scrubby sections, and some rock scrambling. I am not expecting the rock scrambling to be exposed, though with an exploratory trip one can’t be certain. 9 fairly energetic km, with some slow times while we search for routes through cliff lines. Total ascents and descents around 300m broken into several 50 to 80 metre sections. Map: Nerriga. Leader: Linda G. Transport: $90 per car. A 1.5 hour drive from Queanbeyan. Limit: 12.

Further Information

#4 for our leader, but #2 for me. Previous 28 Oct 14.

Summary

Distance: 7.5km | Climb: 350m | Time: 9.20am – 3.05pm (5hrs 45mins), including 50 mins of breaks | Grading: S/R; M(10++)

Photographs

Photographs are available, where you can start a large sized slideshow. Many show part of my GPSr case or carabiner 😕 .

Videos

Waypoint and Track Files

None published.

Track Notes

A bit over 1hr 30mins to drive from Queanbeyan. Parked in a layby on the Nerriga Road at Bulee Gap. Enjoyed a quick climb to Bulee Lookout for views over Willies Creek and to the west.

We got ourselves to ‘Pagoda Pass’ and had morning tea.

From there, we walked north along the east side of the SH752 ‘island’ plateau, following the line of a very gentle spur. An ‘island’ because it is completely enclosed in cliffs, except the morning tea spot. Lovely runs and ledges of sandstone on the cliff tops with huge views. The banksia flowers seemed particularly vibrant orange today and there were patches of wattle in yellow flower. We reached the top of the cliffs at the 700m contour in the NE corner and searched for a pass to take us down to 40m below. No go at first, so the party doubled back to a suitable pass to exit. Monster rock formations above.

We walked a couple of hundred metres round the base of the cliffs (to under the point were we couldn’t get down), then 300m in 10mins gently down and up through spindly scrub to the base of the cliff line to the NE. We walked the base of the orange cliffs, passing a cave. Linda found a way up which I struggled with a bit.

Back on the tops we found lunch near the edge of the cliffs, but back a bit with some shrubs to protect us from the wind. Kill your sound to watch video 1.

We headed generally south after lunch, executing a little wiggle with another tight scramble through a pass. A long leg through light scrub and sandstone runs via SH774.

A canyon-like pass, which perhaps could be called ‘Fat Gentlemans Pass’ was negotiated on our return to the cars beside the Nerriga-Braidwood Road.

This was a fabulous walk, a little challenging for me at one place. Book on walks scheduled by this leader!

Track Maps

Track

Party

9 walkers – Lachlan B, Peter C, Philip and Jan G, Linda G (leader), Ian H, Jenny H, Ian W, me.

Next Tuesday’s Walk

Tuesday 6 June: Tinderry Nature Reserve  –  L/R. Starting from the Tinderry Road, we’ll follow the Round Flat Fire Trail for 6 kilometres, then spend most of the day off-track, in the catchments of Tinderry and Groggy Creeks on the eastern side of the reserve, before returning on the same fire trail. The off track section is slow going, though generally easier than Namadgi, and we will see numerous attractive granite outcrops, and mature forests. he trip is in the same area as the walk on 2nd May, but the route differs. There may be some rock scrambling required to negotiate the granite outcrops. Off Track: 9 km, On Track: 11 km. Bookings by the Friday night before. Minimum distance: 20 km with 800 metres of ascent. Map: Tinderry. Leader: Ian W. Transport: 124 km return.

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... bushwalking in the ACT and nearby NSW. I began my love affair with the ACT bush in 2004 after completing the Canberra Bushwalking Club's annual Navigation Refresher. Seven sessions of navigation and bushcraft shared by living legends had me hooked. It's grown from a passion to an obsession. With other responsibilities it's hard to get away overnight, so I usually only day walk. I like gadgets and technobabble. Information on this blog is shared in the hope that it might encourage others to get out and breathe a bit of fresh air.